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09-07-2011, 16:49   #1
Russell30342
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Is my Heart Rate too High?
I am 37yrs old male 5ft9 158lbs and started running 6 weeks ago. I ran the Peachtree 10K in 1 hour in 7 mins. My average heart rate was 178 with a max of 191. 65 Mins above my target hear rate.

I run about 3-4 days a week for 3-6 miles.

My Polar monitor says I should be in the 150 range. I can't get to this range when I am running. I have several hills where I run and the temp is about 80 - 85 degrees.

How do I train within my target heart rate while running?

When can I expect my cardio to improve?
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10-07-2011, 01:03   #2
tgalati4
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Running at 150/191 is 78.5% of your maximum HR. Running at 178/191 is 93% of your maximum HR. That would be consistent with how you run during a race. During training, you want to keep your HR below 80% so that you don't strain your heart. It's a muscle just like your calf muscles. Except you don't feel it when it becomes strained.

You can run at whatever pace you want, but recovery and training at moderate pace is important for building an aerobic base. Hot weather and hills will take their toll. Try walking up the hills to let your HR recover.

Expect to see results in 3 months. Take 3 days of rest before your next race then let us know how you did.

Make sure your watch is programmed with 191 as your maximum HR, not 220-age (which would be 183 and that's too low).

Last edited by tgalati4 : 10-07-2011 at 01:06.
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10-07-2011, 03:08   #3
sharkbait_au
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Hello,

I am currently dealing with the same problem. I managed to get my average from 77-83% down to 63% on the last run I did, this resulted in running about 4km/hr slower than normal, I intend to slow down even more. It felt strange at the very start, like running on the spot almost, but I soon warmed to it. I believe it naturally inclines you to run with the pose method, I barely placed a heel on the ground. Just one word of caution, two days later and my lower legs are feeling it, so possibly allow yourself a couple of days to recovery after your first go.

Warning. I also believe your heading for an overtraining related injury. Don't learn the hard way like myself and so many others... slow down. I am a firm believer that this slowing down will help you to speed up in the long run.

Happy running
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10-07-2011, 21:15   #4
Russell30342
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Thanks for the info
Thanks that sounds like good advice. I walk up some of the hills now I will extend the walking until my heart rate goes down below 155.

I tried to slow down yesterday and had a Max of 184 and average of 161. My watch is set for a 183 Max heart rate so I will change that for my run tonight.

I ran over 4 miles yesterday. If I run 3 times a week 4 -6 miles is that too much running? Should I cut it back to 2-4 miles?
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11-07-2011, 02:50   #5
sharkbait_au
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Is it too much running? I don't think so, just pace yourself properly. I think it depends on how much effort is required. I think you don't have to worry too much about how much you run, just make sure that you get enough rest. This may require you to run the majority of your runs at a slower pace (will gradually improve), and just occassionally run some faster ones (guessing once or twice a fortnight?). This is what I have come to understand, from the information I have read over the past few months, I may be wrong.
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11-07-2011, 23:18   #6
tgalati4
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Try barefoot running. That will definitely slow you down. Start off with short distances (1/2 to 1 mile), because it takes time to toughen up your feet.

Now you see why 220-age formula doesn't work for everyone. If you run a race and hit a peak HR of 191, but your watch defaults to 183, then your zones will be off and it will affect your training. If, after a few races, your maximum HR goes slightly higher, then set your watch accordingly.

The amount of training is entirely up to you. If your legs feel sore, take 2 days off. If your resting HR is elevated in the morning, then take two days off. So you need to keep track of your resting HR in the mornings. For instance if your resting HR is 65 normally, but you read 75 in the morning after 3 days of training, then take 1 or 2 days off. If you really want to get technical on heart recovery then search for kubioshrv in the forums.
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12-07-2011, 03:59   #7
Russell30342
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thank you
Thank you for the info. Tonight I ran about 4 miles and walked up some of the steep hills early in the run and then took it really slow up some of the other hills later in the run. That was not easy to do at first but I stuck with it and seemed to adapt to the slow pace.
Average heart rate was 164 86% of Max and I max was 180 so I think this is helping.

Running bare foot frankly scares me so I think I may pass on that one for now. I watched Ted Talks episode about how beneficial it is for you.

thanks again
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12-07-2011, 04:51   #8
sharkbait_au
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Just imagine if you could run as fast as you wanted. How fast would you go 30mph 40? You could win any running event you wanted. Well here you are being told that to win you will need to run slower. So you can run as fast as you need to go! So I presume you just do not want to run slower, because you do not lack the ability.

You specifically asked when you could expect your cardio to improve. I keep reading again and again that if you train above your lactate threshold then you primarily train your anerobic ability. If you want to train your aerobic abilty then you should stay below your lactate threshold. From the figures you have given I believe you are statistically unlikely to have a lactate threshold higher than 159bpm, perhaps see if you can knock a few more beats off your average.
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12-07-2011, 16:42   #9
tgalati4
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For someone who has just started running 6 weeks ago, running slow will give your body time to adjust:

Increase in mitochondrial density and activity
Increase in muscle glycogen stores
Improved muscle vascularity
Purging of liver toxins (from years of inactivity)
Joint toning in ankles, knees, hips
Improved diaphram tone

And perhaps 100 other changes in the body during this time.

So most important is to avoid injury during this phase. Speed will come naturally afterwards.
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